Drugs for lymphoma leukemia to treat brain tumors

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New Cleveland Clinic research shows for the first time that FDA-approved ibrutinib (ibrutinib) for lymphoma and leukemia may also help treat the most common and deadly brain tumors, and may one day be used in patients with glioblastoma And improve survival rates.

According to the report of the American Brain Tumor Association, the survival rate of glioblastoma is very low, and the median survival of patients receiving standard treatment is less than 15 months. Glioblastoma is the most deadly primary brain tumor and is highly resistant to current treatments. There is an urgent need to provide these patients with new treatments as soon as possible.

In an earlier study, Bao and colleagues found that glioma stem cells contained high levels of a protein called BMX (bone marrow and X-linked non-receptor tyrosine kinase). BMX activates a protein called STAT3 (signal transduction and transcription activator 3), which is responsible for the invasive and tumorigenic properties of glioma stem cells. In this new study, the researchers found that ibrutinib works by inhibiting two proteins.

A research team led by Dr. Shideng Bao of the Cleveland Clinic Lerner Institute found that ibrutinib slowed the growth of brain tumors in a preclinical model and prolonged survival by more than 10 times that of existing standard chemotherapy drugs. Studies have found that ibrutinib works by inhibiting glioma stem cells, an aggressive brain cancer cell that tends to resist treatment and spread. In addition, combining ibrutinib with radiation therapy can prevent glioblastoma cells from developing drug resistance. Combination therapy is more effective than radiotherapy or ibrutinib alone in overcoming drug resistance and extending lifespan. Follow-up clinical trials are being carried out intensively, and we look forward to receiving FDA approval as soon as possible.

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-05-leukemia-lymphoma-drug-benefit-glioblastoma.html

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